Bookmark
Print
Facebook
Twitter
GDN FUNDED PAPERS
Simulating Alternatives for Increasing Pass Rate in Basic Education Certificate Examination in Junior High Schools in Ghana
Project :
Author : by Emefa Abra Annor-Amevor and Charlotte Esenam Afudego
Date : 0
Description : There are many challenges in Ghana’s education sector, a major one being the low pass rates in the Basic Education Certificate Exam (BECE) of children in junior high schools (JHS). There is the problem of low examination performance levels of pupils in many public basic schools with about 40 percent of JHS pupils failing to pass the examination. This situation has persisted in spite of Ghana’s obvious commitment to education as evidenced by its policies and budgetary allocations to the education sector. Accordingly, it is submitted that an appraisal is required of the policy and fiscal framework that impacts the pass rate to enable appropriate recommendations to address this challenge.
Simulating Alternatives to Achieve 35% Reduction in Maternal Mortality by 2015
Project :
Author : by Dennis Nchor and Jonathan Adabre
Date : 0
Description : The Integrated Social Development Centre (ISODEC) is simulating two policy scenarios: (1) Training and deploying Skilled Birth Attendants (SBAs) at health centers in the five worst affected regions of Ghana by the year 2015 and (2) Training and deploying SBAs at district hospitals in the five worst affected regions of Ghana by the same year to find out if one or both will help Ghana achieve, or be close to achieving, the MDG 5 target of a maternal mortality rate of 185 per 100,000 live births by 2015.This research would focus more on 5 out of 10 regions of Ghana that are deprived and that have the highest maternal mortality.
Simulating Alternatives to Achieve 35% Reduction in Maternal Mortality by 2015
Project :
Author : by Dennis Nchor and Jonathan Adabre
Date : 0
Description : The Integrated Social Development Centre (ISODEC) is simulating two policy scenarios: (1) Training and deploying Skilled Birth Attendants (SBAs) at health centers in the five worst affected regions of Ghana by the year 2015 and (2) Training and deploying SBAs at district hospitals in the five worst affected regions of Ghana by the same year to find out if one or both will help Ghana achieve, or be close to achieving, the MDG 5 target of a maternal mortality rate of 185 per 100,000 live births by 2015.This research would focus more on 5 out of 10 regions of Ghana that are deprived and that have the highest maternal mortality.
Water Provision Initiatives in West Java: PAMSIMAS & PESAT Foundation
Project :
Author : by Ahmad Komarulzaman
Date : 0
Description : The overall objective of this study is to estimate and compare the cost-effectiveness of two programs (PESAT and PAMSIMAS) designed for piped water supply to water-scarce regions. The study sites are located in Sumedang district, West Java province.The effectiveness of different water initiatives will be elaborated using cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), which is an economic tool to evaluate the impact of a particular policy intervention. In this study, the CEA compares all the costs related to the policy intervention of two water initiatives. Unlike a cost-benefit analysis, CEA measures benefits with non-monetary indicators. Hence, the CEA will give us the unit cost of an intervention.
Cost-Effectiveness of Water Interventions: The Case for Public Stand-Posts and Boreholes in Reducing Diarrhea Incidence Among Urban Households in Uganda
Project :
Author : by Mildred Barungi and Ibrahim Kasirye
Date : 0
Description : In this study, the authors attempt to address the challenges Uganda faces from limited water resources by analyzing the cost-effectiveness of two water interventions (public stand-posts and boreholes)—in terms of their capacity to reduce the burden of disease due to diarrhea as captured by the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) avoided. The specific research question is: which of the two water interventions leads to least cost per DALY avoided among urban residents.
Cost-Effectiveness and Benefits-Cost Analysis of Some Water Interventions (the Case of Bauchi State, Nigeria)
Project :
Author : by Ebere Uneze, Ibrahim Tajudeen and Ola Iweala
Date : 0
Description : This report presents the cost-effectiveness analysis of water interventions in Bauchi state, Nigeria, with particular emphasis on pipeline and borehole (hand pump) water supply schemes. Using the measures adapted from Whittington et al. (2008), this study estimates the cost and effectiveness measures such as time savings and health benefits aimed at reducing the incidence of diarrhea and deaths from the disease.
Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Middle Upper Education in Mexico
Project :
Author : by Héctor Juan Villarreal Páez and Sunny Arely Villa Juárez
Date : 0
Description : At the basic level our education cost-effectiveness analysis focuses on budgetary issues. The authors to work with two specific measures: First, a comparison between public expenditure and enrolled students – a measure that can be interpreted as the cost of educating a student. Second, a comparison between normalized public expenditures by terminal efficiencies – this measure can be interpreted as the cost of a student graduating. To work with both the measures is important, given that the graduation rates between systems can vary considerably.
The Role Of Migrants’ Remittances In An Unstable Low Income Economy: A Case Study Of Malawi
Project :
Author : Chinyamata Chipeta; Willie Kachaka
Date : February 0
Description : Malawi is a low-income country with a population of about eleven million people, of whom 15 percent lives in urban areas. In 2001, the country had a per capita income of only US$170. The number of people living below the national poverty line was estimated at 65.3 percent in 1998, with the ultra-poor accounting for 28.7 percent of the total population1. Since then the number of the poor has increased and was estimated at 68 percent of the total population in 2003. The country’s economy is dominated by agriculture, which contributes about 37 percent to gross domestic product. About 95 percent of export earnings originate in this sector. Agriculture is also the source of employment and livelihood for 85 percent of the population. Subsistence agriculture is the main source of income for the rural population, especially the poor, and accounts for the bulk of its income (National Statistical Office, 2000). Changes in Malawi’s gross domestic product are subject to wide fluctuations. The poor are very vulnerable to these fluctuations, which usually originate in agriculture where they are caused by changes in weather and in the terms of trade. Migrants’ remittances are not the main source of income of poor Malawian households, but they are significant. In 1998, for example, 20.3 percent of poor households received remittances. These remittances accounted for 4.9 percent of total per capita consumption and 6.3 percent of total per capita daily income. In the same year, 20.2 percent of the households that were ultra-poor received remittances. Among this group, remittances accounted for 6.2 percent of total per capita consumption and 8.2 percent of total per capita daily income. For all households, remittances accounted for 12.8 percent of household income in 1998. Their relative importance varied between the different regions, accounting for 35.4 percent of total household income in the Northern Region, for 7.7 percent in the Central Region and for 9.0 percent in the Southern Region. Their relative importance also varied between rural and urban areas, accounting for a larger percentage of household income in the former than in the latter. External remittances account for a smaller fraction of the total. As a percentage of GDP imports and exports, these remittances reached their peak in 1975. Since then, they have declined in response to a marked fall in the number of migrant mine workers. Records show, however, that there has been a steady increase in the amount of remittances from abroad since the early 1990s.
Trade Liberalization, Migration and Poverty
Project :
Author : Rajat Acharyya; Rajat Acharyya
Date : December 0
Description : For a large number of developing countries, migrants’ remittances provide a significant amount of support to domestic consumption, predominantly through private transfers in the form of family maintenance expenditures and repatriation of foreign savings. In some of these countries, for example, Sri Lanka, the contribution of workers’ remittances from abroad is as high as 8% of GDP. Even for larger countries, such as India, remittances are of critical importance to certain sections of the population and in recent times contribute about 2% of the GDP. There is however, wide regional differences in remittance earnings in all such countries – some regions within a country have historically set up a connection with other countries regarding migration of labor and receive steady streams of migrant remittances. For example, a recent study by Zachariah, Rajan and Perera (2004) demonstrate that migrants’ remittances account for 22% of the net state domestic product in Kerala, a southern state of India. A large portion of these earnings originates in the gulf areas of the Middle East. The paper also identifies goods and services – durables and non-durables, which the recipients indulge in consuming out of the remittance earnings.
The Impact of Trade Liberalization on Revenue Mobilization and Stability in Sudan
Project :
Author : Kabbashi Medani Suliman
Date : December 0
Description : This study examines the buoyancy and the elasticity of the Sudanese tax system paying particular attention to the impact of trade liberalization on revenue mobilization and the stabilization role of the fiscal sector. The liberalization reform of 1992 was comprehensive. Its main objectives as far as the fiscal sector is concerned were to improve the incentive system and to enhance the tax yield and equity as well as to liberalize trade. The expectations were that the reform would increase the level of investment and income growth and hence broaden the tax base. The results of the analysis over 1970-2002 reveal that the tax system as a whole is not buoyant or elastic; the same results were also obtained for the major tax handles, namely; income and profit taxes, import duties and excise tax. In order to compare the performance of the tax system before and after liberalization, estimates of the nominal measures of tax buoyancy were carried over 1970-91 and 1992-2002. The results show that for total tax revenue, income tax, profit tax and excise tax, the direction of changes of tax buoyancy is difficult to ascertain. However in the case of import duties the estimates suggest that buoyancy improved after the reform. Real measures of buoyancy and elasticity confirm this general results and indicate that the composition of total tax is skewed away from trade and income taxes towards domestic indirect tax.
 
Narrow Your Search